Be The Fork In The Road

Hello everyone! My name is Clay Collins and welcome to today’s episode of The Marketing Show. Today I want to actually address a question that someone asked inside my marketing program during a mentorship call. Every single week, I do a mentorship call with members of the marketing program, coaching program. And a few weeks ago, someone asked the following question.

They wanted to know point blank why their marketing campaign was not working. They wanted to know why sales weren’t being made. And after talking with this person we determined the reason why they weren’t making sales had nothing to do with desire. People wanted their product. There was evidence all over the place, that people wanted their product.

However, making a sale requires two things. Okay? The first thing that it requires is…desire, and desire-based tension that is relieved when someone buys the product. The second thing that it requires is often overlooked. And this truth is going to be painful to a lot of people. But the second thing that is required to make a sale is a decision. Okay? And I know this is obvious, but let me drag this home because this is one of the most important marketing distinctions you will ever hear.

I want to just sort of introduce you to something. One hundred percent of the people that don’t decide whether to buy your product or not, will not buy if you are not relevant enough in the mind of your customers, to get down to make a decision that they will never ever buy. Most people who are of your target demographic, who are likely to buy your product, most of those people who don’t buy, don’t buy because they carefully thought about your product, considered it, and decided not to go with it. Most of them didn’t buy your product because they never made a decision about it in the first place. The return on investment of making a decision is often very, very low. We encounter things all the time, every single day, that we never make a decision about. So many decisions come across your plate as a business owner that you don’t decide to do one thing or another about them. And that’s the case in your market. Most of your customers have never made a decision about whether or not to buy your product. And that is why you haven’t had many sales.

And if you can get your customer base, or if you can get your prospect base, to make a decision about you, even if most of them decide not to buy your product, you will have more sales because a whole lot of people will decide to buy your product. And that’s why when you see launches, on the internet, that’s why so many people have cut off dates, where they’re saying, “We’re closing the cart. We’re cutting this off at 50 people.” Often it’s not to create scarcity; it’s to get people to make a decision, one way or another. But often those kinds of false cut offs don’t work at all, because even with those false cut offs, people don’t decide one way or another, whether they want the product. And they don’t buy it by default. That cart closes and no one buys it by default.

So your job as a marketer, I propose, is not only to create desire-based tension, that’s part of it. You do have to have desire. But often, even more important than creating desire, is being relevant enough to get people to make a decision about you. And on this mentorship call that I was doing with this client, we figured out how they can be relevant enough to get people to make a decision one way or another. The purpose of good marketing is not to get people to buy your product. The purpose of marketing is to get people to make a decision about you, because almost no one in your market is making a conscious decision about whether or not to buy your product. They’re not buying your product by default. They never made a conscious decision about it. And your job as a marketer, and your job in the world, is to be a fork in the road. Someone can go one way, someone can go another, but they cannot go on, like they were before, before they knew you. Your job as a marketer is to be relevant enough that the force of presence that you have in your market is a divider. It is a scalpel, it slices things up. And after someone has encountered your marketing message, did they not have the choice to go along like they did before. They can either go one way, or they can go another. But their life has changed because of the concepts and ideas that you have introduced into your marketplace. Your job is to be a fork in the road. And I have some sad news. And that is that most people in this world are not relevant enough to their customers to even warrant a decision. They are completely ignored. And there is a whole system and a whole arsenal of tools to ensure that you are relevant enough to your marketplace to warrant a decision being made about you, one way or another. Because the purpose of marketing is not to get people to buy your product. It is to get people to make a decision. This should be relevant enough to make a decision.

I don’t have time to go into all of that. Luckily on this call, we had time to work out a plan for during the mentorship call, but really I could talk about this, and I have material about this that goes on for hours. But here’s what I want you to know, and here’s what I want you to figure out and to let sink in, and that is this. Almost no one has made a conscious decision whether or not to buy your product. And your job as a marketer is to get people to make a decision. And even if the majority of people who make a decision about you, decide not to buy, you will have so many more sales because you are relevant enough to be worthy of making a decision about.

My name is Clay Collins. Thank you so much for watching The Marketing Show. And I’ll catch you later. Take care.