A/B Test: Which Product Image Increased Opt-ins 34.43%?


We’ve often noticed that opt-in rates rise when you put an image of the product you’re offering in your LeadBox™ (Yes, even if you’re not really giving away a physical product).

So say you’ve run an A/B test and, predictably enough, found that an image of a CD (and its case) increases opt-ins for your online courses.

Success! But now what? Do you stop there? The answer should be “NO!”

In most cases, there will always be another way to improve your landing pages and LeadBoxes®. Sometimes, making even the smallest tweaks to an element that’s already converting can increase opt-ins substantially. That’s what Jae Jun did with this A/B test he ran on his stock-analysis software site,  OldSchoolValue.com.

Jae began A/B testing two LeadBox™ images of his product, one focusing on the cover of the course and one on the disc inside.

Which version do you think increased opt-ins for this LeadBox™ by 34.43%?

Go down to the comments and tell us which one you’d choose and why—then vote below to see if you were right!

Vote to reveal the winning A/B-tested LeadBox and our analysis.

Vote: Which Page Won This Split Test?
1 What's Your Vote?
2 And the Winner Is...
Prominently-Titled Case with Blue & White Design
Prominent CD with Black & Tan Design
1 What's Your Vote?
2 And the Winner Is...
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Free Download: See Results from 20 of the Best Split Tests We've Featured on Our Podcast, ConversionCast (Called "The Split Testing Encyclopedia of Results").
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YES! Nice call!
Nope! Try Again Next Time!
Winner: Version A created an overall increase of 34.43%
52% 48%

How People Voted

Click here to see our take on these results

If you chose Version A you are correct!

Version A, with a 99.79% probability of outperforming Version B, increased opt-ins by 34.43%.

Although we can’t say with total certainty why this change caused the increase, here are a few of my speculations:

  1. The image in Version A includes the title of the mini course, potentially increasing clarity around the offer.
  2. The more modern case design shown in Version A may have given the impression that the mini course is new and up to date, thus increasing its perceived value even further.

A/B testing can help you determine which images work best for you and your business, no matter how similar they may appear. Despite multiple similarities, Version A (the title-focused image, with the blue and white design) outperformed Version B, increasing opt-ins by 34.43%.

Why do you think Version A outperformed Version B? Let us know in the comments!

Not all visitors are the same, but A/B testing your imagery may be something to consider for your own LeadBoxes™.

Click here to get the free split-test guide

What Do You Think?

Did this test’s results surprise you? Why do you think Version A increased conversions so dramatically? Leave a comment below and let us know your thoughts.

If you’re new to LeadPages™, you should know that all Pro and Advanced users can run any A/B test inside LeadPages™ in just five clicks.

Do you have a LeadBox like this one that you would like to test? If so, you can set up the exact same type of test in under a minute. You can also A/B test headlines, text colors, call-to-action buttons, form fields, and just about any other change you can think of.

Watch the quick video below for an introduction to enabling split testing on your LeadPages™ account.


  • Fred

    I prefer B – this is all just subjective.

    • Daphne Sidor

      Thanks for weighing in, Fred! It’s interesting how a bunch of subjective preferences can ultimately add up to some clear data. 😉

  • Thanks for showing this. The thesis to change the image was that create a clean image where
    1) more wording on the actual “product” to create impression of value
    2) investors like to see things go up

    I’ve been using the B image for a long time because it looks tangible, but my guess is that the image doesn’t look as modern or impactful as A.

    • Daphne Sidor

      I’d agree with that assessment. (And I love “investors like to see things go up” as a principle, haha.)