A/B Test: Did a Red or Green Button Increase Opt-Ins by 31.31%?

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Red means stop. Green means go. It’s simple when you’re on the road . . . and much less simple when you’re on a landing page.

In past A/B tests, we’ve seen green buttons out-convert red ones and red ones out-convert green ones. It seems to depend a lot on what else is on your landing page and who’s looking at it.

That’s why an A/B test like today’s is a good idea for most businesses to try—the answer isn’t obvious from existing best practices.

Which button color worked best for this subscription LeadBox for a children’s-ministry website? Did green mean go? Or did red mean hurry up and get through the light?

Which color do you think increased opt-ins for this LeadBox™ by 31.31%?

Go down to the comments and tell us which one you’d choose and why—then vote below to see if you were right!

Vote to reveal the winning A/B-tested LeadBox™ and our analysis.

Vote: Which Page Won This Split Test?
1 What's Your Vote?
2 And the Winner Is...
50%
Green Button
Red Button
1 What's Your Vote?
2 And the Winner Is...
3 Free Guide
66%
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YES! Nice call!
Nope! Try Again Next Time!
Winner: Version A created an overall increase of 31.31%
56% 44%

How People Voted

Click here to see our take on these results

If you chose Version A you are correct!

Version A, with a 97.58% probability of outperforming Version B, increased opt-ins by 31.31%.

Although we can’t say with total certainty why this change caused the increase, here are a couple of my speculations:

1. The shade of green in Version A is bright and attention-getting but still harmonizes with
the blue and yellow of the logo, making for a more cohesive and professional look than Version B.

2. The shade of red used in Version B is rather intense and “in your face,” potentially deterring visitors from opting in.

Why do you think Version A outperformed Version B? Let us know in the comments!

Not all visitors are the same, but A/B testing your button color may be something to consider for your own LeadBoxes®.

Click here to get the free split-test guide

What Do You Think?

Did this test’s results surprise you? Why do you think Version A increased conversions so dramatically? Leave a comment below and let us know your thoughts.

If you’re new to LeadPages, you should know that all Pro and Advanced users can run any A/B test inside LeadPages in just five clicks.

Do you have a LeadBox™ like this one that you would like to test? If so, you can set up the exact same type of test in under a minute. You can also A/B test your headlines, call-to-action copy, images, and just about any other change you can think of.

Watch the quick video below for an introduction to enabling split testing on your LeadPages account.

https://youtube.com/watch?v=3h3pQKLagng?showinfo=0

More About A/B Testing

A/B Test: Which Call-to-Action Button Color Increased Opt-ins 132.41%? For another example of the power of A/B testing a LeadBox™’s button color, check out this between a green button and a yellow button.

4 Ways to Optimize Your Split Testing Strategy for Better Results and Crystal Clear Insights A/B testing has become one of the easiest ways to increase conversions. Learn how to optimize your A/B testing strategy for better results and insights with these 4 simple tips.

  • Green for go – got one right

    • John Nye

      Wooooooohoooooo, excellent job Keely!

      • LOL !! The red lipstick, or the green traffic light ……….

        • Watch this out: Green – Relax: forest, park, meadow, etc. Red – red lipstick: be careful, temptation, you deal with woman, be Aware, it’s might be Lovely Sweet or Danger… Halt!

  • I like both but for other things than marketing. Green I will chose – cause I feel relax.

    • John Nye

      Thanks for weighing in, Leonard!

      • Any way, I’m curious what PLS Split Test shows?

        I bet 75% to 25% – Green vs Red

  • Watch this out: Green – Relax: forest, park, meadow, etc. Red – red lipstick: be careful, temptation, you deal with woman, be Aware, it’s might be Lovely Sweet or Danger… Halt!

  • Helen

    Thanks for this post! Today in the trend translucent buttons . What do you think about it? I create my landing page with Q-page builder. It offers several templates with transparent buttons , and they really look better than not transparent

    • John Nye

      Hey Helen, I’m glad you enjoyed this one.

      In my opinion, translucent buttons look great from an aesthetic point of view. However, the button will lose some prominence on the page as it will not stick out as much to the visitor. Because of this, you may miss out on colder leads and “curiosity clicks” that you may receive with a more prominently colored button. As a result, your opt-in rates may take a hit.

      With that being said, I would say translucent buttons could be more useful for secondary calls to action (buttons that lead to a page’s secondary goal like “view details”). With this strategy, you’re still guiding people towards your page’s primary goal with a bolder button, while providing a second option for those who may not be ready to opt-in at that time.

      But, I wouldn’t be a good Split Test Analyst without saying its worth running a test on this. After all, you truly don’t know what your customers prefer unless you test it.

      Please let me know if decide to try that out!