A/B Test: Which Background Color Increased Opt-ins by 113.35%?


Colors can have a huge impact on your mood. You don’t have to be an interior designer to realize this—just imagine how you’d feel if every day you had to wake up and go to work in an office whose walls were painted neon orange and pea-soup green.

In an environment like that, it’s hard to imagine feeling inspired to do anything but pack up and leave. And it’s the same way with your landing pages. You need to consider whether the colors you use are telling visitors to come in and stay awhile, or to get out now.

As an A/B test analyst, I have seen a simple change in the color of a call-to-action button greatly affect how many people click that button. But what if a color change doesn’t involve your call to action? What if it’s just hanging out in the background? Does it matter as much?

In this A/B test, green and grey backgrounds face off to determine which color will increase the opt-in rate.

Which version do you think increased opt-ins for this LeadPage® by 113.35%?

Go down to the comments and tell us which one you’d choose and why—then vote below to see if you were right!

Vote to reveal the winning A/B-tested LeadPage® and our analysis.

Vote: Which Page Won This Split Test?
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2 And the Winner Is...
Green Background
Grey Background
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2 And the Winner Is...
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YES! Nice call!
Nope! Try Again Next Time!
Winner: Version B created an overall increase of 113.35%
55% 45%

How People Voted

Click here to see our take on these results

If you chose Version B you are correct!

Version B, with a 99% probability of outperforming Version A, increased opt-ins by 113.35%.

Although we can’t say with total certainty why this change caused the increase, here are a few of my speculations:

  • The green and yellow color combination is very intense, and visitors may not have found it very appealing.
  • The neutral gray background in Version B puts all the focus on the content areas of the page, a choice which may have better directed visitors’ attention to the call to action.

Why do you think Version B outperformed Version A? Let us know in the comments!

Not all visitors are the same, but A/B testing your background colors/imagery may be something to consider for your own LeadPages®.

Click here to get the free split-test guide

What Do You Think?

Did this test’s results surprise you? Why do you think Version B increased conversions so dramatically? Leave a comment below and let us know your thoughts.

If you’re new to LeadPages, you should know that all Pro and Advanced users can run any A/B test inside LeadPages in just five clicks.

Do you have a LeadPage® like this one that you would like to test? If so, you can set up the exact same type of test in under a minute. You can also A/B test your body copy, images, calls-to-action, and just about any other change you can think of.

Watch the quick video below for an introduction to enabling split testing on your LeadPages account.


More About A/B Testing Colors

A/B Test: Which Ultimate Button Color Increased Opt-ins by 68.32%?
For another example of the power of colors, check out this LeadBox™ test.

A/B Test: Which Text Color Increased Conversions by a Whopping 121.52%?
Think you know colors? Check out this A/B test to see which text color increased conversions by nearly 122%. Vote to reveal the winner!

  • Ha! Was going to go with A but thought B had the neutral background so the opt-in might stand out better. Grey is not a great background colour, but for the purposes of this experiment, it makes sense.

    • Daphne Sidor

      Agreed, Keely! Gray would probably perform poorly as a button color, but as a background color it just . . . fades into the background.

  • Kathryn Lehan

    The majority of people stick to the “safe” choice. The green color, or any color, heightens the emotions so people back away. They choose safe colors – white, black, gray, beige, etc. – instead because it requires no emotional commitment. We see this every day when we drive. Probably 90% of cars on the road are in the no color spectrum – white, silver, light gray, medium gray, dark gray and black. Oh to see a green or yellow car again!

    • Daphne Sidor

      Interesting psychological take, Kathryn! (And I agree . . . our landscapes would be much more interesting with more colorful cars on the roads!)